Category Archives: Political theory

and more on the future of work

In the new spirit of reblogging here things I have already blogged elsewhere, here is a piece that appeared today on the LSE blog at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2017/04/11/future-of-work-taking-the-blinkers-off-to-see-new-possibilities/ (their headline not mine). Future of Work: taking the blinkers off to see new … Continue reading

Posted in commodification of knowledge work, Cybertariat, Labour in the 21st century, Political theory, The world | Leave a comment

The hardest nettle to grasp

This referendum vote can be seen as the revolt of the losers from globalisation. Continue reading

Posted in political reflection, Political theory, Politics, The world, Theoretical musings | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

A lightning conductor for anti-neoliberalism

The EU is not so much a single monolithic entity as a terrain of struggle: better in than out. Continue reading

Posted in Labour in the 21st century, political reflection, Political theory, Politics, The world, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

If passengers were the commodities

With yet another international trip imminent, I start to steel myself for the nightmare I know the journey will be. To an abrupt stop-go rhythm you will puff your way along endless corridors, then stand in a zig-zag line for … Continue reading

Posted in Autobiography, Labour in the 21st century, personal memoir, political reflection, Political theory | 1 Comment

The creativity of bar tenders

I have just experienced one of those disruptive moments when different aspects of life come into headlong collision with each other. And, now, in reflecting on this, I am adding yet another interruption to the ever-lengthening to-do list for August … Continue reading

Posted in Autobiography, Dalston, Labour in the 21st century, life in Dalston, Political theory, Theoretical musings, Work Organisation Labour and Globalisation | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The importance of the minimum wage

This is the sixth in a series of posts on what sort of welfare state we might want. The first can be found here, the second here, the third here, the fourth here and the fifth here. Although it is … Continue reading

Posted in Britain, Labour in the 21st century, political reflection, Political theory, Politics | Leave a comment

Left and right libertarianisms: where will we swing next?

My recent post on an unconditional citizen’s income has sparked quite a bit of correspondence, reminding me of an article I wrote 20 years ago for Red Pepper, published as ‘Contesting Liberty’,  in which I discussed the way in which … Continue reading

Posted in political reflection, Political theory, Politics, Theoretical musings | Leave a comment

The income tax taboo

This is the fifth in a series of posts on what sort of welfare state we might want. The first can be found here, the second here, the third here  and the fourth here. There seems to be an unshakeable … Continue reading

Posted in Britain, political reflection, Political theory, Politics, Theoretical musings | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Don’t attack the baby boomers

This is the fourth in a series of posts on what sort of welfare state we might want. The first can be found here, the second here and the third here. When I wrote about tax credits a couple of … Continue reading

Posted in Britain, political reflection, Political theory, Politics | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

An unconditional citizen’s income

This is the third in a series of posts on what sort of welfare state we might want. The first can be found here and the second here. In these straitened times, the idea of a basic income, granted unconditionally … Continue reading

Posted in Britain, Labour in the 21st century, political reflection, Political theory, Politics, Theoretical musings | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments